What's Out There

What's Out There

“We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special.”

- Stephen Hawking

Dubium sapientiae initium.

Doubt is the origin of wisdom.

- René Descartes
I’ve told the kids in the ghettos that violence won’t solve their problems, but then they ask me, and rightly so; “Why does the government use massive doses of violence to bring about the change it wants in the world?” After this I knew that I could no longer speak against the violence in the ghettos without also speaking against the violence of my government
- Martin Luther King Jr.  (via elige)
manoftheworldmagazine:

On May 1st 1963 Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gumbo climbed through 70mph winds and negative 30-degree temperatures to plant the American flag on the summit of Mount Everest for the first time.
Sherpa Gumbo, who had never before used a camera, turned Jim’s NikonF vertical to capture this iconic image.
Photograph by NAWANG GUMBO / Man of the World / Issue No.5
manoftheworldmagazine:

On May 1st 1963 Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gumbo climbed through 70mph winds and negative 30-degree temperatures to plant the American flag on the summit of Mount Everest for the first time.
Sherpa Gumbo, who had never before used a camera, turned Jim’s NikonF vertical to capture this iconic image.
Photograph by NAWANG GUMBO / Man of the World / Issue No.5
manoftheworldmagazine:

On May 1st 1963 Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gumbo climbed through 70mph winds and negative 30-degree temperatures to plant the American flag on the summit of Mount Everest for the first time.
Sherpa Gumbo, who had never before used a camera, turned Jim’s NikonF vertical to capture this iconic image.
Photograph by NAWANG GUMBO / Man of the World / Issue No.5

manoftheworldmagazine:

On May 1st 1963 Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gumbo climbed through 70mph winds and negative 30-degree temperatures to plant the American flag on the summit of Mount Everest for the first time.

Sherpa Gumbo, who had never before used a camera, turned Jim’s NikonF vertical to capture this iconic image.

Photograph by NAWANG GUMBO / Man of the World / Issue No.5

Only when human emissaries were doing the exploring did people feel a vicarious attachment to the dramas unfolding on the space frontier.
- Neil deGrasse Tyson
spaceexp:

Neil Armstrong eating his last breakfast on Earth before leaving for the Moon.
spaceexp:

Neil Armstrong eating his last breakfast on Earth before leaving for the Moon.

spaceexp:

Neil Armstrong eating his last breakfast on Earth before leaving for the Moon.

Earth-bound history has ended. Universal history has begun.
- Earl Hubbard
Light, unlike any other kind of wave ever encountered, does not need a medium to carry it along. Light is a lone traveler. Light can travel through empty space.
- Brian Greene, The Fabric of the Cosmos

"As the spacecraft emerged from behind the far side of the Moon, they pulled out the camera, looked through the window of the command module, and captured Earth rising over the lunar landscape. This widely published image, titled Earthrise, presented Earth as a cosmic object, aloft in the sky of another cosmic object. It was simultaneously thrilling and humbling, beautiful and also a little scary.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson

"As the spacecraft emerged from behind the far side of the Moon, they pulled out the camera, looked through the window of the command module, and captured Earth rising over the lunar landscape. This widely published image, titled Earthrise, presented Earth as a cosmic object, aloft in the sky of another cosmic object. It was simultaneously thrilling and humbling, beautiful and also a little scary.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson

"As the spacecraft emerged from behind the far side of the Moon, they pulled out the camera, looked through the window of the command module, and captured Earth rising over the lunar landscape. This widely published image, titled Earthrise, presented Earth as a cosmic object, aloft in the sky of another cosmic object. It was simultaneously thrilling and humbling, beautiful and also a little scary.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson

I can have some influence on people who are still in school. That’s where I, as a scientist and an educator, can do something to help teach them how to think, how to evaluate a claim, how to judge what one person says versus what another says, how to establish a level of skepticism. Skepticism is healthy. It’s not a bad thing; it’s a good thing. So I’m working on the next generation as they come up. I don’t know what to do with the rest. The 80 percent of the adults, I can’t help you there.
- Neil deGrasse Tyson

strangebiology:

These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.

There is something more terrible than a hell of suffering - a hell of boredom.
- Victor Hugo, Les Miserables